Rescue your days fishing!

One of the biggest perks with having the shop is meeting different anglers, hearing their stories and usually there is a lesson involved! I have picked up countless tips and tricks over the years that have helped change my approach on fishing. Salmon anglers can learn a great deal from the trout men, there are a lot of tips to pick up from the pike guys and I think we could all learn plenty of lessons from the coarse fishing side!

This week I wanted to share one tip that could very well rescue your days fishing, saving you from packing up in frustration when you start to feel that trickle of water down your legs. Waders, put simply, they are going to leak! Usually its the seams and it doesn’t take much to make them start letting in. A slight overstretch of the seams when clambering up a bank or kneeling down to release a fish can be enough to cause a leak. But even the most expensive waders are not worry free, yes they may have more layers and a better fit but the great equaliser of all waders is the dreaded barbed wire. Whether your waders cost £1000 or £100 that piece of barbed wire hidden in the grass will make short work of them, a mis-timed cast in an awkward wind will quite easily give your fly the chance to penetrate any wader and turn what should be an enjoyable days fishing into a day of soggy depression.

Enter Gorilla Tape. you can pick up a roll for only a few pounds, keep it in your fishing bag because a small length of the tape will instantly seal a burst seam, a rip in barbed wire or puncture. Make some small lengths up, put them in a zip lock bag inside your waders, handy to have when things go wrong and a bit more convenient than carrying the roll with you.

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This kind of tear is what happens when you encounter barbed wire. I managed to do this one when walking along the bank edge and I slipped, the wire made short work of the waders and the cut was at waist level.

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Turn the waders inside out and try to get them sitting flat. The benefits of using the gorilla tape means you can still make the repair even when the material is wet!

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Cut a length of the tape large enough to provide coverage around the tear, this allows a solid seal and a really strong bond. Round the edges and it stops the tape catching on your clothing when putting the waders on.

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Tear instantly repaired and waterproof again, no leaks and a seriously strong bond that you could happily leave for a seasons use. Get back fishing without any worries of going too deep!

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We have all hit ourselves with a badly timed fly cast., it’s going to happen and its amazing at just how much water can pour through a hole made by a hook point.

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Turn your waders inside out and identify the location of the hole, you can see how small this one was when you compare it to the weave of the fabric but soggy socks guaranteed!

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Again just follow the same process, cut your length of tape to size and round the edges, cover the hole and apply the patch. Try to get the material flat and make sure the edges stick down. If going over a seam I used my thumbnail to make sure the tape pressed in to it, try not to have any gaps

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You're done! Waterproof seal made and you can get back fishing. The tape is available in various colours, I just used the clear to help with showing its potential. Its seriously strong stuff and requires a fair bit of effort to get it off your waders again but it’s worth keeping in the car at least, it could quite easily save your days fishing until you make other repairs.

You can get a roll from any hardware store and even the supermarkets are stocking it, its uses are endless and do not stop with waders. The same process can be applied to a jacket or your waterproof bags should they ever become damaged, just allow that bit of overlap around the damaged area and within a few minutes you can be enjoying your days fishing again.

Tight lines

Mike